cars 2

Olive: Inspired by Cars

When Cars 2 was released to theaters earlier this year, I fully intended to see it. Unfortunately I did not. Jumping ahead to this past weekend, I finally got to watch it on pay-per-view. I enjoying all the familiar characters from the first Cars, as well as the new additions. If you haven’t seen Cars 2 yet, I highly recommend it. There’s a dastardly plot by an evil villain out for world domination, and it involves the oil industry. Very entertaining, and certainly a timely editorial on current events.

As the credits began to roll, it hit me: my concept for Olive’s animated film was missing one very important element: an evil villain with a plan so dastardly that it threatens to destroy the entire world (or at least the entire river).  Yes, the villainous character of Char the Bull Trout still remains, but by comparison with this new evil force, Char is a cuddly teddy bear. And no, the menace does not involve the oil industry.

So, now I’m putting my thoughts to paper, plotting the plot as it were. Everything I’ve developed thus far still fits nicely into the film outline, but now there is a truly dark force that Olive must contend with. It’s going to take the cooperation of all the fish in The Big Stream and all of creatures that rely on the river if they hope to stop this advancing menace. If they can set aside their differences and join forces they can save the Big Stream, and in doing so save themselves.

Does this make you even remotely curious?  I hope so.

I hope it makes some Big Fish curious, too.

That’s the plan. Stay tuned, and thanks for following along.

Imagine the possibilities

You’re a talent scout for a major animation studio. Or perhaps you’re an executive for Dreamworks Animation, Pixar, Sony Animation, 20th Century Fox Animation (Blue Sky Studios) or Walt Disney Animation Studios. Your studio just released or is about to release the likes of Cars 2, Kung Fu Panda 2, The Smurfs, Winnie The Pooh, Happy Feet Two. Life is good–audiences love these movies.

But an animation studio cannot rest on its laurels and must constantly be on the lookout for the next blockbuster hit.

Certainly the fact that there are many sequels being produced indicates that animation studios can get added mileage out of a good initial movie. Cars, Kung Fu Panda, Happy Feet and scores of other movies have all spawned sequels.  Similarly, producing a movie based on long-established characters such as Winnie the Pooh or The Smurfs offers instant recognition in the marketplace.  It’s easy to see why remakes and sequels get made: it’s easier to build on an established and successful film than to create something totally from scratch. But are sequels always as good as those that preceeded them? That’s discussed often: HERE is one such website.

This is not to say that brand new ideas aren’t being made into animated movies. Earlier this year we saw Gnomeo and Juliet, Rio, and Rango. All seemed to be at least reasonably popular given their box office ticket sales.

But what about the next great, truly unique storyline?  Where does the previously unheard of idea come from?

I’m glad you asked, and the answer is right here.

A catchy title. A unique concept. An engaging cast of characters. The framework for a storyline which can be built upon. All the elements of a good children’s story. A strong underlying message of environmental conservation and awareness that also promotes getting kids outside and exploring nature. Olive the Woolly Bugger offers all this.

So, if you’re that talent scout or studio executive, consider this food for thought. You may not have heard of Olive the Woolly Bugger, but a lot of people have. And with your vision, a lot more people will.

Tag, you’re it.